Jesse Tree (December 8)

December 8th

Symbol:


A Lamb

Here’s a neat video tutorial on making a lamb ornament out of sculpey clay.  Ours looks just like this one — we just stuck in one of those metal hangy-things for ornament balls before baking him.  He’s significantly cuter than all our other ornaments 🙂

Scripture Reading:

The Passover and the Exodus:  Exodus 12:1-41

Main Ideas:

Remind the children of the prequel to this story:  after settling in Egypt with Joseph for several years, the children of the Israelites became slaves in Egypt.  The Egyptians treated them harshly and the Israelites cried out to God for help.  God heard their cry and raised up a deliverer for them in Moses.  The story of Moses as a child is fascinating and I wish there was time here to read about it.  If you aren’t familiar with it, you should take time to read it too, or find a children’s story book that covers all of Moses’ life.

Before rescuing the Jewish people from Egypt, God sent a final, devastating plague over Egypt: death of all firstborn sons.  The Jewish people were saved only if they followed God’s explicit directions to sacrifice a lamb and put the blood on the doorway of their homes.  When the Angel of Death came through, He would see the house covered by blood and “pass over” that house.  This first Passover foreshadowed our deliverance from sin and death through the blood of Jesus — the last Lamb.

Discussion Questions (these questions were taken from Narration 14 in The Story of God and Man*):

  1. What did you see of the attributes of God in this story?
  2. In this story what did you learn about man? (Man can come to God only by the way God chooses.  Man must have faith in order to please God and be saved.)
  3. What was the last plague that touched the Egyptians?  (It was the death of the firstborn in every family.)
  4. What did the Israelites have to do to escape this last plague? (They were to choose a perfect lamb—without spot or blemish.  They were to kill it and gather the blood in a bowl.  They were not to break any of the lamb’s bones.  They were to put the lamb’s blood on the top and sides of their doors.  They were to stay in the house.)
  5. Let’s say that an Israelite said, “This is a very nice lamb and I paid  a lot of money for it. So instead of killing him, I’m going to tie him to the doorway of my house so that God can see him as He passes over the house.” What would happen in this house? (The firstborn would die because the house owner had not believed and done what God said.)
  6. In each Israelite home, who died in place of the firstborn?  (The lamb died in the place of the firstborn.)
  7. What proof did the Israelites give to show that the lamb had died in place of the firstborn? (The blood of the lamb on the doorposts of the house was the proof of its death.)
  8. How do we know that God accepted the death of the lamb in the place of the firstborn son? (We know that God accepted the death of the lamb because he passed over the house and the firstborn lived.)
  9. Do you remember another similar example when God accepted the death of an animal in the place of a person dying? (When the ram died in the place of Isaac.)

For more information on the tradition of using a Jesse Tree for Advent, please visit this Squidoo page!

For yesterday’s reading, click here.

To proceed to December 9th, click here.

For access to all the Jesse Tree readings, click here.

Resources used for this study:

* Christianity is Jewish

* The Story of God and Man a booklet that goes through “narrations” of scripture, starting at the beginning, and brings you through a biblical worldview while building up the story of our Savior.  Email me at onebeggarsbread@gmail.com for details about getting a copy.

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4 thoughts on “Jesse Tree (December 8)

  1. Hi there,

    I found your blog when I googled “Jesse Tree storybook preschoolers” 🙂 This is our second year doing a Jesse Tree and I was looking for any good storybooks designed for young children.

    I, also, am a stay at home momma. 🙂

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