Which Theologian Are You?

You scored as Anselm. Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period.He sees man's primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read 'Cur Deus Homo?'

Anselm
100%
John Calvin
87%
Karl Barth
87%
Friedrich Schleiermacher
80%
J?Moltmann
80%
Jonathan Edwards
73%
Martin Luther
67%
Paul Tillich
33%
Charles Finney
27%
Augustine
20%

Which theologian are you?
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Pretty neat quiz. I needed clarification on a few of the questions, so I'm not certain I answered according to the depths of my soul. Try it! Which theologian are YOU?

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5 thoughts on “Which Theologian Are You?

  1. You scored as Anselm.
    Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period.He sees man’s primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read ‘Cur Deus Homo?’

    Anselm 100%
    John Calvin 87%
    J?Moltmann 67%
    Friedrich Schleiermacher 67%
    Karl Barth 67%
    Martin Luther 60%
    Jonathan Edwards 60%
    Charles Finney 53%
    Paul Tillich 33%
    Augustine 33%

  2. That was fun.

    What theologian is David Porta? Here’s the results.

    Porta scored as KARL BARTH, the daddy of 20th Century theology. Porta perceives liberal theology to be a disaster and so insists that the revelation of Christ, not human experience, should be the starting point for all theology.

    My tie-breaker question was between Barth and Anselm.
    Which is more true?:
    “All Christian theology must begin with the revelation of Christ”
    or
    “Man’s main sin is failing to give to God the obedience that we owe him.”
    Both true. Just a matter of emphasis.

    I was strong with 3 guys, middling with another, only one third with 4 others, just a fifth of another, and zip with the guy with the funny name.

    100% Karl Barth – Dissed by some conservative evangelicals, but for what? I dunno what he did. A gay Protestant priest considered Barth a bastion of orthodoxy.
    100% Anselm – I never heard of him until I saw “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.” Saint Alselm. Who is he? “Cur Deus Homo?” Why read it? Anselm in Wikipedia? Ahhh!
    93% Martin Luther – What! I’m Lutheran, and I didn’t score 100% agreement with Martin?! Shocking!

    60% John Calvin – Calvin is OK. Except when he isn’t. “Bring me dead roses.” ~Rolling Stones. Is the tulip withered?

    33% Augustine – Luther was an Augustinian monk. I heard, “If it’s Luther then it’s Augustine.” If this survey has any merit, that must not be exactly so. Good.
    33% Paul Tillich – A Lutheran existentialist, wasn’t he? But that’s a contradiction in terms, no?
    33% Charles Finney – Wasn’t Keith Green enamoured of him? A “holiness” guy, was he? Isn’t that close to works righteousness? I say: “Sola Scriptura; Sola Gratia. Sola Fide.”
    33% Jurgen Moltmann – Never heard of him. I met a German student named Jurgen. Kurt Jurgens is an actor.

    20% Jonathan Edwards – Hard-core Calvinist, wasn’t he? “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” That him?

    0% Friedrich Schleiermacher – Love to say that last name. Sounds familiar. Who he? Ah, Wikipedia: “absolute dependence.”

  3. Funny. 🙂 I have some of Anselm’s work if ya wanna read it…

    My first two are yours and dad’s flopped.

    You scored as John Calvin.

    Much of what is now called Calvinism had more to do with his followers than Calvin himself, and so you may or may not be committed to TULIP, though God’s sovereignty is all important.

    John Calvin 100%
    Anselm 93%
    Martin Luther 73%
    Jonathan Edwards 67%
    Friedrich Schleiermacher 67%
    Karl Barth 67%
    Augustine 60%
    Charles Finney 47%
    J?Moltmann 40%
    Paul Tillich 30%

  4. “Infant baptism is necessary to deal with original sin.”

    I selected “mildly agree.”

    I wonder if that nixed me with Calvin.

    “Infant baptism is necessary to deal with original sin.”
    Since, of course, that *is* why it is there.
    Necessary? That hung me up. But. We know of no other means of grace given us for an infant.

    “The Church should be involved political and social liberation.”
    Fully agree.
    One soul at a time, one conscience at a time.
    And should be a moral voice to the world, on topics of political and social moment. As on abortion, and slavery, etc.
    Of course, we should lift up the name of Jesus, not Karl Marx.

    “God’s sovereignty is supremely important in theological discussion.”
    I took that to be a descriptive statement, and, hence, obviously false.
    “Theological discussion” is pretty much the province of sinners (I’m one) and if God’s sovereignty were supremely important, would there be error?

    “Theology unites all the other academic disciplines and is the most important one.”
    Strongly disagree.
    Academic disciplines are divided, not united.
    So, taking it as a descriptive statement, the evidence suggests “False.”
    And let’s not forget theology versus Copernicus. Theology is a human enterprise, after all.

    “Sinners will be tormented in a literal lake of burning fire forever and ever.”
    On the fence, there. I may have been “mildly agree.” (Because gehenna in the gospels.) Oh, Lord, have mercy on me.
    “Lake of fire” was part of what John “saw” when he was “in the Spirit.”
    The OT teaches us that dreams and visions are given not as literal truth, but for interpretation.

    “Eschatology should occupy the main place in Christian theology.”
    Strongly disagree.
    I say that Jesus is the “main” man.
    Jesus should occupy the main place in Christian theology.
    “Jesus is coming soon,” is but a part of who Jesus is.

    “The papacy is a tool of the devil.”
    That’s obvious to any good Lutheran.

    “God’s existence is evident by the sense of sheer dependence that we have on him.”
    Strongly disagree.
    I guess that’s why I flunked Schleiermacher.
    “the sense of” is what decided me. The evidence of God’s existence is not dependent on our perception (or feeling) of it.

    Danielle said: >I have some of Anselm’s work if ya wanna read it.

  5. My score:
    Martin Luther 60%
    Charles Finney 60%
    John Calvin 53%
    Anselm 47%
    Karl Barth 40%
    Friedrich Schleiermacher 33%
    Augustine 33%
    JMoltmann 33%
    Jonathan Edwards 27%
    Paul Tillich 20%

    Hmmm… I don’t know who half of these people are, but I DO find it funny that I have Luther and Calvin scored highly … right alongside Finney. Doesn’t just show the extent to which the paradox of the Bible has split my little pea-brain in to two?

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